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Tuesday, September 11, 2012

7 Signs Of A Reputable Dog Rescue Organization



For many owners of rescue dogs (including myself), the checklist of what a reputable dog rescue organization looks like is discovered long after the adoption takes place because the excitement of dog ownership takes precedent over the practicality of researching a rescue beforehand.

While many rescue organizations have their hearts in the right place in wanting to place dogs in the right homes, many fail to comply with the standards that cause a rescue to be considered reputable. 
 
In my opinion, the Ohio Great Dane Rescue offers the most extensive list of what a reputable rescue looks like but since their list is 32 items long I decided to highlight only 7 of them but please refer to their list for further information as needed.



1) A reputable rescue makes sure animals are up to date on all vaccines, and microchips where appropriate to ensure all pets are healthy, up to date on all shots, heartworm tested/on prevention, and received necessary vet care before placement.

Most rescues obtain an Intrastate Health Certificate which means it is only good for transporting reasons. If you adopt from a rescue be sure to take your new pet to your own vet for a check up. 



2) A reputable rescue takes responsibility for the animals adopted through them for the span of each animal’s life, not "just” for the span of foster care or transport.

Many of our clients who have adopted dogs from rescues STILL receive yearly or twice-yearly check-ups from their rescue agency. Now, that's impressive! 


3) A reputable rescue will never “hurry up” a process, or waive requirements simply for the convenience of the adopter.

Putting pressure on the public to adopt by a certain date in fear that the dog(s) will be euthanized or put back in van for a lengthy trip back to the rescue organization is unfair to potential adopters and equally unfair to the animals who have been transported to an adoption site. 

In my opinion, it is the rescue organization's responsibility to have a foster home or animal shelter reserved for the dogs in case adoption does not occur at the adoption site.



4) A reputable rescue will help adopters make decisions about which animal is a good fit for their home, and will offer advice and assistance on meeting the correct animal for the adopter.



    5) A reputable rescue helps educate new adopters, and may require adopters to participate in training courses to assist in a good adoption.



    6) A reputable rescue keeps animals in foster care, or in situations where the animal was at a shelter, works with shelter staff for a short period of time before placing them, to screen for health or behavior problems.

    Rescue workers should have foster homes in place and they should keep in touch with them regularly. Every effort should be made to place dogs in a permanent home as soon as he/she is ready.



    7) A reputable rescue is not for profit, and works on adoptions, not sales.

    Before adopting from a rescue organization be sure it is licensed to operate as a shelter and not as a pet store store. 


    If you are considering adopting a dog from a rescue organization, please take this checklist into consideration. You'll be happy you did! 

    26 comments:

    1. That is a very important list...pay attention everyone!

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    2. Great advice and we think peeps should take their time and think long and hard before going ahead. Bahhhhh in my case it took like twenty seconds on a road for my peeps to gotcha me , but then again are you surprised.
      Best wishes Molly

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    3. Very good advice. The rescue group MOM got me from is not long around. And looking at the list I think MOM can see why now. But I am glad that MOM got me before they disappeared.
      Blessings,
      Goose

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    4. Those are very important points! Thanks for sharing.

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    5. Daisy's adoption process was not a pleasant one and if I had done my research on what a reputable rescue was all about I wouldn't have adopted her; however, I am glad I have her in my life as it wouldn't be the same without her.
      Please do your research ahead of time as your adoption process should be a pleasant experience and not a difficult one!

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    6. This is is an excellent post with very important information. Mom is always saying that the decision to adopt a dog, cat, etc. is a HUGE decision and should be treated like any other huge decision. There are many "rescues" that start out with the best of intentions but simply become overwhelmed so that they are no longer able to provide proper care for the animals.

      Garth

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      1. Your mom is right in that many rescues start out with the best of intentions but then get overwhelmed with the responsibilities it all entails. I know this because I've spoken to the owners of the rescue that Daisy came from and could certainly relate to their wish to rescue all of the dogs but it has to all be done ethically, etc, in order to gain a positive reputation.

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    7. fabulous post and as others said with important info. I am sharing!

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      1. Thank you, Caren, for the compliment and for sharing this information with others!

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    8. Great checklist. I would have never thought about the whole issue if you hadn't brought it to my attention.

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      1. Glad this information was helpful for you! It would be wonderful if everyone read this list prior to adopting because it would help so many people have a better adoption experience!

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    9. This is such an important post and we agree with every word. Thanks. Will share xox

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      1. Glad you found this post to be helpful and informative, Austin! Thanks for sharing it with others!

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    10. These are very important points, thank you April!!!

      p.s. the link to the Ohio Great Dane Rescue seems to be broken? Not to worry, I'll google it! yay! take care
      x

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      1. Hello Old Kitty,
        Thanks for telling me that the link was broken! I fixed the error! Glad you found this post useful!

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    11. Very good advice. We've been thinking of possibly adopting another pack member but haven't found the right one yet. We were surprised to find out that the county animal shelter knows absolutely nothing about the animals they're adopting out. So we're now looking into small dog rescues but haven't found just the "right" one yet.

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    12. #1 should be that they are licensed as a rescue and import from other states, if they don't have the certification for your state do not adopt from them.

      Also Vet checks and home visits should be mandatory, period. Especially if there are other animals in the home!

      woof - Tucker

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      1. I meant:
        #1 should be that they are licensed as a rescue and IF THEY import from other states THAT CORRECT CERTIFICATION, if they don't have the certification for your state do not adopt from them.

        I actually think you should support your local rescues first.

        woof - Tucker

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    13. As a foster coordinator for a Dachshund Rescue - I thank you for posting this!!!

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      1. Thank you for the compliment, Cole! This information is an important read for all potential adopters!

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    14. I think rescues are wonderful! However, I sometimes feel that they are a little to strict in their policies about whom to adopt to. I have a friend who tried several rescues to adopt a Chihuahua, at the time she lived in an apartment. None of the rescues would adopt to her because she did not have a yard. Which I think is not right, a dog can live just as happily in an apartment as they do with a house and a yard. I live in an apartment and we have no yard whatsoever, however, my two (Chihuahuas) get taken for long walks just about every day (weather permitting), plus we have relatives who live in the burbs where we take them so they can run in the yard. And I know my two have a very happy, pampered, and spoiled life! My friend, who wanted to give a rescue a good home, ended up getting her two dogs from a breeder. I have made a promise to myself that my next dog will be a rescue, but I'm afraid that I will run into this same problem.

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    Woof! Meow! Meow! Thanks for leaving a comment!